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What does "The Future of Oral Argument" look like?

Justice David T. Prosser
Justice David T. Prosser

Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice David T. Prosser got a glimpse into some of the possibilities while serving on a discussion panel at the 2014 spring meeting of the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers. The conference was held May 1-3 in Chicago.

"Although changes in technology have had a less obvious effect on oral argument, the practice still has changed during our careers, with shorter arguments, fewer arguments, and hotter panels," a description of the panel discussion stated. 

The panel discussed the role of technology in oral argument and whether the use of technology may contribute to or possibly detract from the effectiveness of oral argument, Prosser said.

Among other forward-looking topics discussed at the conference: "The Future of Briefwriting," which featured Judge Richard A. Posner, U.S. Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit; and "The Future of Law Firms."

The non-profit Academy of Appellate Lawyers was founded in 1990 "to advance the highest standards and practices of appellate advocacy and to recognize outstanding appellate lawyers."

Justice David T. ProsserAuthor Andrew Guthrie Ferguson quotes a 1986 article written by Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson in his 2012 book, Why Jury Duty Matters: A Citizen's Guide to Constitutional Action. The article, titled "Justice and Juror," is about Abrahamson's experience being called to serve as a juror in Dane County.

Ferguson's book reflects on the importance of jury service and the responsibility each citizen has to fulfill his or her constitutional responsibility. Ferguson is an attorney in Washington, D.C. and an associate professor of law at the University of the District of Columbia David A. Clarke School of Law.

Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson greets and congratulates Advanced Placement government students from Janesville Craig and Parker high schools who visited Madison on March 24.
Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson greets and congratulates Advanced Placement government students from Janesville Craig and Parker high schools who visited Madison on March 24.

Advanced Placement government high school students from Janesville were able to meet with Chief Justice Shirley S. Abrahamson on March 24 as part of the Madison Seminar program, the Janesville Gazette reported.

The students also met with Sen. Tim Cullen, Rep. Amy Loudenback, and Wisconsin Manufacturing and Commerce Vice President of Government Relations Scott Manley to discuss a variety of state government issues, according to the article.

Abrahamson spoke to the students about impartiality on the bench, citing a case where she had to put her personal feelings aside in order to follow the law.

The group, which is led by Craig High School teacher Scott Gudgel and Parker High School teacher Joe Van Rooy, will write research papers and opinion pieces based on their experience as part of the seminar.

People who file for temporary restraining orders and injunctions in Dane County can now receive notification via telephone and email when the orders have been served, states an article in the Wisconsin State Journal.

According to the State Journal, the feature is available through the national automated service VINE Link, which already provides status information about individuals incarcerated in Wisconsin.

The restraining order and injunction feature also allows petitioners to seek assistance immediately from local law enforcement if there is a violation, the article quotes the Dane County Sheriff's Office as saying.

Supreme Court law clerks moved the admission of Atty. Elizabeth Payne (right), law clerk to Justice Michael J. Gableman, at a group admission ceremony in the Supreme Court Hearing Room on April 10. It was the first time a motion to admit has been made by all the current serving law clerks. Photo credit: Deb Heneghan, State Bar of Wisconsin Ramona Hackbarth of the Watertown Arts Council delivers three new artworks to the Dodge County Justice Facility. Courthouse Art Curator Geri Schrab and Dodge County Circuit Court Judge John R. Storck accept the art. The Dodge County Courthouse currently has 31 pieces of art on display from the Watertown Arts Council circulating art collection.
Supreme Court law clerks moved the admission of Atty. Elizabeth Payne (right), law clerk to Justice Michael J. Gableman, at a group admission ceremony in the Supreme Court Hearing Room on April 10. It was the first time a motion to admit has been made by all the current serving law clerks. Photo credit: Deb Heneghan, State Bar of Wisconsin Ramona Hackbarth of the Watertown Arts Council delivers three new artworks to the Dodge County Justice Facility. Courthouse Art Curator Geri Schrab and Dodge County Circuit Court Judge John R. Storck accept the art. The Dodge County Courthouse currently has 31 pieces of art on display from the Watertown Arts Council circulating art collection.

 

 

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